Drama

Drama and Oracy are taught in discrete lessons from Reception to year 6. Oracy is a whole school focus and is also implemented by teachers across the curriculum.

Spoken language underpins the development of reading and writing, and communicating effectively is a vital life skill.  Through drama, Sandringham children are developing their oracy skills through storytelling, monologue, and discussion with a focus on using correct terms and grammar.

In Years 4 and 5 children have the opportunity to study Shakespeare. In drama, they explore and unpick Shakespearean language while learning about themes and character relationships. 

Shakespeare School’s Festival

We have taken part in Shakespeare School’s Festival for the past four years and have performed Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Julius Caesar and The Tempest.

SSF is a fantastic opportunity for children to get involved with learning about Shakespeare! They are the UK's largest youth drama festival, offering students from all backgrounds the opportunity to perform Shakespeare plays on their local professional stage.

In the drama lesson, all children are encouraged to participate and use their voice to discuss, share and reflect on learning.

Oracy

What is Oracy? 

Oracy is the ability to communicate effectively using spoken language. 

We want all children to be able to talk with confidence and to articulate themselves clearly.

Pupils refer to the different strands of oracy that we established after training from School 21, and are based on the oracy strands developed by Voice 21 and Cambridge University.

The four strands of oracy are:

 

    

 

We know it is essential that children continue to develop their oracy skills at home and in different contexts outside of school.

Easy things you can do:

Making eye contact with your child will help your child to focus when you are speaking to them. Body language is so important when talking to your child, as it shows your child that you are interested in what they are saying. 

Face your body towards your child to show them you are engaged in the conversation.

Expect your child to be polite and model being polite. 

Speak to your children the way you want them to speak to you. 

Remind your child to say please and thank you. 

Encourage your child to speak in full sentences. When your child asks for something, repeat back their request using a full sentence so that you are modelling the language you want them to use.

What else can I do to help?

Walking to and from school is a great time to talk to your child. Here are some good conversation starters to encourage your child to talk about their day:

  • Tell me about something new you found out today<
  • What was challenging today?
  • Tell me about something kind/brave/fun you did today.

For more information on our drama and oracy curriculum please speak to our drama spealist teacher.

Contact Us
Sandringham Primary School
Sandringham Road, London E7 8ED
tel: 020 8472 3800